© 2023 charminggangster.com. Сайт создан на Wix.com

  • Facebook Social Icon

 

L-2-HGA (L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria)

L-2-HGA is a neurometabolic disorder. It's affects the central nervous system, with clinical signs usually apparent between 6 months and one year (although they can appear later). Symptoms include epileptic seizures, "wobbly" gait, tremors, muscle stiffness as a result of exercise or excitement and altered behaviour.

Test not only diagnoses dogs affected with this disease but can also detect those dogs which are carriers, displaying no symptoms of the disease but able to produce affected pups if mated to another carrier.

The test results identifying dog as belonging to one of three categories:

CLEAR: the dog has 2 copies of the normal gene and will neither develop L-2-HGA, nor pass a copy of the L-2-HGA gene to any of its offspring.

CARRIER: the dog has one copy of the normal gene and one copy of the mutant gene that causes L-2-HGA. It will not develop L-2-HGA but will pass on the L-2-HGA gene to 50% (on average) of its offspring.

AFFECTED: the dog has two copies of the L-2-HGA mutation and is affected with L-2-HGA. It will develop L-2-HGA at some stage during its lifetime, assuming it lives to an appropriate age.

Carriers can still be bred to clear dogs. On average, 50% of such a litter will be clear and 50% carriers; there can be no affecteds produced from such a mating. Pups which will be used for breeding can themselves be DNA tested to determine whether they are clear or carrier.

Hereditary Cataract (HC) 
Affected dogs develop cataracts in both eyes at an early age. The condition is not congenital, so the lenses are normal at birth but cataracts appear at a few weeks to months in age, progressing to total cataract (and resulting blindness) by 2 to 3 years of age.
Test diagnoses dogs affected with this disease and can also detect those dogs which are carriers, displaying no symptoms of the disease but able to produce affected pups if mated to another carrier.

The test results identifying dog as belonging to one of three categories:

CLEAR: the dog has two copies of the normal gene and will neither develop Hereditary Cataract, nor pass a copy of the Hereditary Cataract gene to any of its offspring.

CARRIER: the dog has one copy of the normal gene and one copy of the mutant gene that causes Hereditary Cataract. It will not develop Hereditary Cataract but will pass on the Hereditary Cataract gene to 50% (on average) of its offspring.

AFFECTED: the dog has two copies of the Hereditary Cataract mutation and is affected with Hereditary Cataract. It will develop Hereditary Cataract at some stage during its lifetime, assuming it lives to an appropriate age.

Carriers can still be bred to clear dogs. On average, 50% of such a litter will be clear and 50% carriers; there can be no affecteds produced from such a mating. Pups which will be used for breeding can themselves be DNA tested to determine whether they are clear or carrier.

Persistent Hyperplastic Primary Vitreous (PHPV)

This is a congenital condition (present from birth) in which there is a developmental defect in the normal regression of some of the intraocular structures of the eye. PHPV can range from being very mild to severe abnormalities which may lead to blindness. 
Due to PHPV seldom resulting in secondary cataracts in the Stafford, those that are mildly afflicted will seldom show any form of visual impairment during the course of their lives. Even those that are more severely afflicted, may be capable of adapting by using peripheral to compensate. 
The present knowledge of the mode of inheritance of this disease is thought to be an autosomal irregular dominant with variable expression.
This disease can be detected by ophthalmic screening from 6 weeks of age and if it is affected, whatever the condition of the problem at that stage it will not change throughout the dogs life.

It's very important to use in breeding only tested dogs.